Alerts in the last 24 hours

No Personalised Alerts!

To see personalised alerts you need to be logged in.

Log In

Amazon.com Inc. Add to portfolio

NAS:AMZN, May 20, 07:35 UTC

Latest NAS:AMZN News

Filter your feed

Apply Filter

Today


News

Will Amazon Lose Almost Half of Its Prime Members? Don't Bet on It

AMZN

Last month, CEO Jeff Bezos finally disclosed the service has 100 million subscribers, most of which are paying at least $99 per year for the company's free two-day shipping and bundle of services. While the company doesn't report revenue directly attributable to its Prime program, the company reported $9.7 billion in total subscription services revenue, the bulk of which is Prime subscriptions. As a comparison, if Amazon's subscription revenue was its own company it would be the 289th largest, narrowly edging out the Huntsman Corporation. However, Huntsman isn't growing its top line by 52% per year like Amazon's subscription revenue. During a call with investors in April, Amazon announced it's increasing the price of its Amazon Prime service. In a poll of 7,000 Prime members, nearly half (45%) responded by saying they are planning to leave the service due to price increase. But Amazon investors should not count on lower revenue from Prime subscriptions. Also, after a latent post-acquisition period, Amazon is now looking to more aggressively integrate Whole Foods into its Amazon Prime product with two-hour Whole Foods delivery in select cities and 10% discounts for members. While there will be some marginally attached subscribers who will choose to cancel the subscription, it's doubtful this figure will run as high at 45%. However, this will be offset from the higher prices and increased spending attributable to secondary revenue effects.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
News

Amazon's Artificial Intelligence Helped TV Viewers Identify Royal Wedding Guests

AMZN

Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle tied the knot at Windsor Castle on Saturday during a ceremony that began at noon, London time, which was 7 a.m. EDT across the pond and 4 a.m. on the West Coast. While many of us in the U.S. slept or started our days in other ways, millions of our fellow citizens and hundreds of millions around the world tuned in to the extensive TV coverage of the royal wedding. Those watching via British broadcaster Sky News' livestream didn't have to rack their brains to identify famous wedding guests, thanks to Amazon.com's (NASDAQ: AMZN)artificial intelligence (AI). These are the type of questions that were answered by Sky News' "Who's Who Live" function, built by a collaboration between the U.K. broadcaster, Amazon Web Services, and AWS partners GrayMeta and UI Centric. As the 600 guests entered St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle, the livestream function used Amazon Rekognition to identify notable attendees, such as royals and celebrities, via on-screen captions. Amazon Rekognition is a cloud-based technology that uses AI to recognize and analyze faces (that woman is in her 30s and is deep in thought), and recognize objects, scenes (that's a beach), and activities (that's a boy riding a bike) in images and video.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Technology
  • Science
News

The Amazonification of Walmart Continues

AMZN WMT

At first sight, it may appear Walmart's (NYSE: WMT) performance under CEO Doug McMillon is lacking. There's more to the story as McMillon has done an admirable job refocusing a company that had lost its momentum under prior CEO Mike Duke while repositioning the company for the future. Walmart Labs has nearly 400 job openings, with most sounding more like positions at Amazon, including data scientist, cloud computing engineer, and streaming data engineer. While Walmart has a long-term focus to compete with Amazon for the e-commerce market, the company will continue to be defined by its brick-and-mortar retail channel. However, Walmart is looking at using technology to wring out efficiencies from its 700 million square feet of U.S. retail space. Legacy shareholders purchased the company expecting a brick-and-mortar retailer, not a technology company. Even if Walmart's largest group of shareholders -- the Walton family -- is on board with a tech-focused future, it may not be enough to offset the fears of value and dividend-oriented investors expecting steady returns, reliable capex spend, and seemingly prudent acquisitions -- pretty much the opposite of technology companies. Therefore, it's likely Walmart will not be afforded the same latitude as Amazon.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial

Yesterday


News

Trump’s Feud With Amazon Has Nothing to Do With Defending the Postal Service

AMZN DTRUMP

Trump’s Feud With Amazon Has Nothing to Do With Defending the Postal Service. FortuneMay 19, 2018. News emerged yesterday that President Donald Trump allegedly personally pressured Postmaster General Megan Brennan to double what it charges and other companies to ship packages. That's a shockingly direct effort to harm a U.S. business by a sitting president, especially since even Trump's allies have acknowledged that his ongoing campaign against Amazon and CEO Jeff Bezos is motivated largely by a personal and political grudge. Trump has framed his stance on shipping rates as a defense of the Post Office, which he claims is losing money on its contract with Amazon. But Brennan herself has reportedly tried to convince the president he's incorrect.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Politics
  • Financial
  • News

Friday, May 18


News

Report: Trump Urged Postmaster General to Double Rates for Amazon, Others

AMZN DTRUMP

President Donald Trump personally urged U.S. Postmaster General Megan Brennan to double the shipping rates for and other companies, according to a Washington Post report. Postal Service, which delivers around 40% of Amazon packages during the final leg of their travel, according to the report. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 3, 2018. While we are on the subject, it is reported that the U.S. Post Office will lose $1.50 on average for each package it delivers for Amazon. The Postal Service has called the relationship with Amazon mutually beneficial, according to the Post, and says it has similar arrangements with other companies. While the USPS still loses money overall, its package delivery profits grew 11.8% in the 2017 fiscal year, according to news site Vox.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
News

Amazon Offers More Perks to Justify Increased Prime Fees

AMZN

On May 15, e-commerce giant Amazon (AMZN) announced that it expects to offer a discount of 10% on sale items, as well as other weekly discounts on select items, at Whole Food stores to its Prime members. This move has been in the cards since it acquired Whole Foods for $13.7 billion in August 2017. The move is aimed at attracting more of the company’s customers to Whole Foods.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
News

Chico's FAS Embraces the Future With an Amazon Partnership

AMZN

Like many brick-and-mortar retailers, it's been a tough path for Chico's FAS(NYSE: CHS). In a nascent but growing trend, retailers are deciding that if you can't beat 'em, join 'em. As a result, they're collaborating with companies like Amazon to immediately improve their e-commerce operations. Plans are to make the apparel eligible for Amazon Prime, which includes free two-day shipping. While the initial partnership will only include jewelry, athleisure, and limited Chico's brands, the company plans to eventually bring its Soma line of lingerie and its White House Black Market upscale collection to the mix. Amazon is the clear winner here. While Chico's may benefit from the relationship in the short run, Amazon investors should be encouraged by the continued migration of brands from competing with Amazon in e-commerce to partnering with it.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
News

Trump Wanted to Double Amazon Postal Rates, Washington Post Says - seattlepi.com

AMZN DTRUMP

A letter carrier holds Amazon.com Inc. packages while preparing a vehicle for deliveries at the United States Postal Service Joseph Curseen Jr. and Thomas Morris Jr. processing and distribution center in ... more Photo: Bloomberg Photo By Andrew Harrer. Postal Service officials to double package delivery rates paid by Amazon.com Inc. and other companies, the Washington Post reported, highlighting that his beef with the e-commerce giant and founder Jeff Bezos goes beyond tweets. Trump recently ordered a review of the Postal Service’s finances and suggested on Twitter that it might start charging Amazon higher delivery rates. Amazon relies on the Postal Service for the so-called last mile (delivery from warehouses to customers’ homes) on as many as 40 percent of all U.S. orders, according to analysts’ estimates. While the relationship is mutually beneficial, it saves Amazon as much as $2.6 billion a year versus rates charged by independent couriers such as United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp., analysts say.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
News

Trump reportedly urged Postmaster General to charge Amazon more

AMZN

President Trump has been angry at Amazon for some time now. He has said that the company and others like it are a bad deal for the US Postal Service. Now The Washington Post reports that Trump has personally pushed the US Postmaster General to double the rates Amazon is charged to ship packages. According to The Washington Post, postmaster general Megan Brennan has declined to do so on several occasions, telling the president that rates are set via contract and reviewed by a regulatory commission.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
  • News
News

Trump reportedly urged postmaster to double Amazon rates

AMZN DTRUMP

President Trump has been angry at Amazon for some time now. He has said that the company and others like it are a bad deal for the US Postal Service. Now The Washington Post reports that Trump has personally pushed the US Postmaster General to double the rates Amazon is charged to ship packages. According to The Washington Post, postmaster general Megan Brennan has declined to do so on several occasions, telling the president that rates are set via contract and reviewed by a regulatory commission.

Read Full Details

Topics:
  • Business
  • Financial
  • News