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Lloyds Banking Group PLC Add to portfolio

LON100:LLOY, Jul 18, 11:53 UTC

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Tuesday, July 16


News

Forget Lloyds! I think this is the better bank to buy for BIG dividends

LLOY

Fool.co.uk16 July 2019, 07:05 UTC. For income chasers seeking a slice of the banking sector, Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) may appear a standout selection. Just look at a gigantic 6% dividend yield for 2019 that leaves the 4.5% broader forward average for the FTSE 100 standing; plans to distribute dividends on a quarterly basis; and a robust balance sheet (with a CET1 ratio of 13.9% as of March), which prompts brokers to forecast another payout hike this year. Take Bank of Georgia Group (LSE: BGEO), for example. While Britain appears to be teetering on the brink of recession and in danger of a prolonged Brexit-related hangover, economic growth in the Eurasian nation continues to impress, and is predicted to keep doing so. Lloyds, on the other hand, may struggle to raise dividends at all should a prolonged and/or destructive Brexit process materialise and cause profits to slide. So give the British bank a miss, I say, and go income hunting in Georgia instead.

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Monday, July 15


News

Closure of Lloyds is 'backwards step' for town set to be left with no bank - Lincolnshire Live

LLOY

You can read more in our cookie notice. Or, if you do not agree, you can click Manage below to access other choices. If you choose not to, you will still see adverts on our site, because they help us to fund it, but those adverts will not be tailored to you. Lloyds has promised that there will be a mobile bank serving Spilsby but people are still waiting to hear more details of how and when this would operate. The town council is to meet next Thursday, July 25 to see what representations could be made to Lloyds. "The town's Post Office recently closed and was put into a shop but it's a small counter and you get two people in at a time and there's a queue. "It's going to be a tight learning curve for businesses and for customers. Not everyone, particularly elderly people, is online." Alan Chambers, who runs card shop If Only and chairs the Spilsby Business Partnership, said: "This is a commercial decision and Lloyds are not going to go back on it. "Businesses are going to have to make alternative arrangements for cash for cash flow and use online banking to cash cheques. "We've had no feedback as to what plan Lloyds is putting in place. "We have heard there will be a mobile service but how long is that for? "We have a lot of unanswered questions.

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News

Lloyds, Callsign will tighten verification process for online payments

LLOY

Lloyds Banking Group — which is composed of banks including Lloyds, Halifax, and the Bank of Scotland, and has 15 million customers actively managing their accounts online — partnered with Callsign, a UK-based cybersecurity startup, last week, according to the Financial Times. Here's what it means: The partnership will help the banking group comply with the EU's upcoming second Payment Services Directive (PSD2) regulation, and other players need to act fast to ensure that they're compliant in time. Over a quarter of online payments will be impossible to complete by PSD2's deadline because banks and merchants haven't finalized their verification efforts, per the FT, and industry players have called for the deadline to be postponed to ensure they can become compliant. Meanwhile, new systems to ensure two-factor authentication haven't been tested at scale, which could lead to further issues with implementation. As such, banks should act now if they don't want to inconvenience their customers by putting their payments at risk of getting rejected or potentially get fined by regulators for noncompliance.

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businessinsider.com
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Sunday, July 14


News

Have I missed something? Could the Lloyds share price be heading to 30p?

LLOY

Fool.co.uk14 July 2019, 07:45 UTC. Whenever I’ve covered the Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) share price in the past, I’ve always concluded that the bank has a bright outlook. Its robust capital position, combined with an attractive valuation and market-beating dividend yield, are qualities that appeal to me as an investor. However, for some reason, the market continues to view the business with scepticism. So here I’m going to try and establish if there’s something I’m missing here, and if the bank is really worth much less than its current value. Economic concerns. As Lloyds is one of the largest banks in the UK and the largest mortgage lender, its fortunes are tied to the prosperity of the country’s economy. Further to fall? If the Bank of England reduces interest rates to zero, Lloyds’ growth will evaporate, and a good deal of its earnings will disappear as well. If you assume earnings fall by 50% from current levels back to 2016’s 2.9p per share, I think the stock could fall as far as 30p.

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Friday, July 12


News

Could Lloyds and Marks & Spencer be FTSE 100 bargains of the year?

LLOY MKS

Could Lloyds and Marks & Spencer be FTSE 100 bargains of the year? Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) and Marks & Spencer Group (LSE: MKS) are two of the least popular high street names on the stock market. Shares in both firms trade well below recent highs and appear to offer value, with well-covered dividend yields of about 6%. Shares in the group have drifted down from about 85p five years ago to just 58p at the time of writing. As the stock has been falling, Lloyds’ profits have been rising. So has the bank’s dividend. So what’s the problem?

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Monday, July 08


News

4 top FTSE 100 dividend stocks? Lloyds Banking Group PLC, Aviva plc, AstraZeneca plc and National Grid plc

LLOY AV +4 more LLOY AV AV AZN AZN NG

The dividend investing potential of FTSE 100 shares Lloyds Banking Group PLC (LON:LLOY) (LLOY.L), Aviva plc (LON:AV) (AV.L), AstraZeneca plc (LON:AZN) (AZN.L) and National Grid plc (LON:NG) (NG.L) is the focus of this article. Could they generate an impressive income return in the long run? It has raised dividends at a fast pace over the last five years, with an improving financial outlook being partly responsible for that in my opinion. It has a P/E ratio of 6.8, which suggests to me that it offers a large margin of safety. Since Aviva has a dividend yield of around 7.6%, I think it could offer income investing potential over the long run. Although it may remain unpopular among investors in the short run, I feel that its strategy may lead to improving share price performance in future years. AstraZeneca’s 3.5% dividend yield may be lower than that of the FTSE 100, but the company’s financial performance has improved in recent quarters.

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Story Sources

investomania.co.uk
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Saturday, July 06


News

Is the Lloyds share price the biggest value trap in the FTSE 100?

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It’s chastening to think buyers of Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) shares at 60-odd or 70-odd pence, when the UK was emerging from recession in the second half of 2009, have seen no reward a decade later. The shares are currently sub-60p and even with 12.8p of dividends, those buyers have seen the real value of their investment decline after 10 years of inflation. And let’s quickly pass over the destruction of wealth suffered by holders who bought in the decades before the 2008/9 recession. As the saying goes, “the stock market is forward looking.” Will long-term investors in Lloyds at today’s share price enjoy better returns than their predecessors? Or is the stock a value trap? I think it’s worth paying some attention to the macro environment when looking at companies in the most cyclical industries, such as banks. Fans of Lloyds suggest its valuation metrics of 1.1 times tangible net asset value, 7.4 times forecast earnings, and prospective dividend yield of 6%, offer a wide margin of safety. However, much the same was said before the 2008/09 recession.

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Friday, July 05


News

Can FTSE 100 dividend stock Lloyds Banking Group boost your wealth?

LLOY

Can FTSE 100 dividend stock Lloyds Banking Group boost your wealth? Overall, I believe there is a lot of potential for the black horse of Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) to ride forwards. The dividend yield at the time of writing is a tasty 5.52%, comfortably above the FTSE 100 average, and is covered 1.71 times by earnings. The EU frequently leave deal-making decisions to the last minute, and they cannot afford to be without the UK payment of £39 billion. So overall at a price of 58.16p at the time of writing I rate Lloyds a buy and will continue to hold the shares myself, as I believe there is a prospect of a decent capital gain, along with a solid dividend.

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Wednesday, July 03


News

5.6 reasons why I think the Lloyds share price could bomb in July

LLOY

5.6 reasons why I think the Lloyds share price could bomb in July. With fresh financials just around the corner I think it’s time that Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) shareholders find something hard to bite down on. The FTSE 100 firm certainly spooked investors in May with news that revenues stagnated and impairments rose in the first quarter of 2019, and signs of worsening economic conditions in the UK suggest that those upcoming financials could be even worse. For Lloyds, and indeed the broader banking sector, Bank of England consumer lending data this week certainly provides plenty to worry about. Sure, aggregated home loans demand in Britain may still be holding up, and could well continue to do so given the huge choice of ultra-cheap mortgage products out there. However, this stability in the mortgage approvals gauge owes much to the ultra-competitive market which is reducing homeowner costs at the expense of profits for Lloyds et al.

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Sunday, June 30


News

Can the Lloyds share price beat Barclays and the FTSE 100 again in the second half of 2019?

LLOY BARC

2019 has been another patchy affair for the big banks. As the half year draws to a close, the Barclays (LSE: BARC) share price trades at roughly the same level it was on 1 January. That makes Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) look relatively good, as its stock has climbed almost 12% to 57p against 9% on the FTSE 100 as a whole. I’m glad to see the Lloyds share price finally showing a bit of momentum, as I have been tipping it for ages. Although frankly, I’d hoped for more than this. This matters to investors because the regulatory punishments for misdemeanours are tough, as Lloyds’ subsidiary Bank of Scotland knows to its cost after recently being slapped with a £45.5m fine for failing to report suspicions of fraud at its HBOS operations in Reading a decade ago.

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