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Thursday, January 10


News

Snapchat founder can't prove Instagram makes you feel ‘terrible’

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Snap insiders and fans - including Miranda Kerr, the Australian supermodel and entrepreneur who is married to Snap CEO Evan Spiegel - have repeatedly blasted Facebook and Instagram for copying Snapchat, especially its stories format. But beyond the copying complaints, which Instagram has not denied, there's another form of criticism that has recently bubbled up: the contention that Instagram is bad for you, while Snapchat is not. The basic theory is easy to understand: Instagram has "likes" and public follower counts, whereas Snapchat does not, and if people are competing for likes on Instagram, they will end up feeling "terrible." But the problem with that easy narrative is the evidence doesn't back it up. Yes, Snapchat seems to beat Instagram in this study. But if even research being paid for by your competitor - a competitor who is trashing you in the press - gives you 89% positive attributes, that's pretty good. And it's not the only evidence to suggest that Spiegel is wrong in his assessment of Snapchat and Instagram's emotional effects. How does using Snapchat or Instagram impact you emotionally? When I heard Spiegel's quote about Instagram in November, I thought it would be worthwhile to try and answer a simple question: How did Snapchat and Instagram affect users emotionally? Snapchat comes out ahead, but there is nothing to suggest Instagram makes its users feel "terrible" - or somehow much, much worse than Snapchat. But this wasn't an academic study and I took the results as a gut check rather than a definitive answer.

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U.S. Military Trusted More Than Google, Facebook to Develop AI

FB GOOGL +1 more FB GOOGL GOOG

(Bloomberg) -- Facebook Inc. is among the technology companies leading the race to develop artificial intelligence. But Americans don’t trust it to do so responsibly, a survey from a U.K. think tank has found. The public was significantly more skeptical about Facebook than other tech companies working on cutting-edge A.I. that wouldn’t pose risks, the survey found. But this still lagged the faith Americans had in other groups to develop A.I. The outcry forced Google to announce it would not renew its contract with the military after it expires this year. Aside from the U.S. military, academics ranked well in the survey, with half of the respondents giving university researchers the two highest confidence scores. While many of the techniques that underpin today’s rapid advances in machine learning were developed in university labs, in the past five years major technology companies have used their ample budgets to hire many of the leading academics working on A.I. and many of the cutting edge advances in the technology are now being produced in corporate research labs.

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Boomers Share the Most Fake News on Facebook, Study Finds

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A new study found that age was the main factor that determined whether someone would spread misinformation on Facebook. A new study of American Facebook users suggests that older generations were most likely to share “fake news” stories during the 2016 presidential election. The researchers also found that conservatives were more likely to share fake news than liberals, but note that this may be due to an overall pro-Trump slant in fake news and not an inherent quality of conservatives. They further refined the list by excluding outlets that could be considered partisan, “such as Breitbart,” the study says—the authors subjectively differentiated partisanship from fake news—and wound up with 21 domains including True Pundit and Denver Guardian.

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Wednesday, January 09


News

Elderly, conservatives shared more Facebook fakery in 2016

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On average only 8.5 percent of those studied — about 1 person out of 12 — shared false information during the 2016 campaign, according to the study in Wednesday's journal Science Advances . But those doing it tend to be older and more conservative. All those lists showed similar trends. When other demographic factors and overall posting tendencies are factored in, the average person older than 65 shared seven times more false information than those between 18 and 29. The seniors shared more than twice as many fake stories as people between 45 and 64 and more than three times that of people in the 30- to 44-year-old range, said lead study author Andrew Guess, a politics professor at Princeton. It could simply reflect that there was much more pro-Trump and anti-Clinton false information in circulation in 2016 that it drove the numbers for sharing, they said. However, Baum said in an email that conservatives post more false information because they tend to be more extreme, with less ideological variation than their liberal counterparts and they take their lead from President Trump, who "advocates, supports, shares and produces fake news/misinformation on a regular basis."

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Analysts See $2.17 EPS for Facebook, Inc. (FB) – Thorold News

FB NDAQ

It increased, as 123 investors sold Facebook, Inc. shares while 598 reduced holdings. 1.61 billion shares or 3.39% less from 1.66 billion shares in 2018Q2 were reported. Tocqueville Asset Mngmt Ltd Partnership owns 1.41% invested in Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ:FB) for 680,201 shares. Analysts expect Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ:FB) to report $2.17 EPS on January, 30 after the close.They anticipate $0.03 EPS change or 1.36 % from last quarter’s $2.2 EPS.

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Cambodian jailed for three years for insulting king on Facebook

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PHNOM PENH (Reuters) - A Cambodian court jailed a man on Wednesday for three years for insulting the king in Facebook posts, the second known conviction under a new lese majeste law enacted last year, which rights groups fear could be used to stifle dissent. "The court announced a verdict against Ieng Cholsa which sentenced him to 3 years in prison and ordered him to pay five million riels ($1,250)," Phnom Penh Municipal Court spokesman Y Rin said. The Facebook posts, which the court found had insulted King Norodom Sihamoni, were uploaded in June last year, Y Rin said. Prime Minister Hun Sen's ruling Cambodian People's Party (CPP) won a general election in July last year which critics said was flawed because of a lack of a credible opposition, among other factors.

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Apple reportedly hired a major Facebook critic and former employee for its privacy team

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Apple has reportedly recruited a former employee and vocal critic of Facebook to join its privacy team, according to the Financial Times. Sandy Parakilas, who spent a year and a half monitoring privacy and policy compliance by software developers before leaving Facebook in October 2012, will reportedly become a privacy manager on Apple's policy team. The reported hire comes at a time when Apple has been placing a huge emphasis on its privacy features, especially compared to its peers in tech including Facebook, Google and Amazon . In a March interview with Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes, Cook responded to a question about what he would do if he were in Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's shoes following the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

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Apple has hired Facebook critic Sandy Parakilas, the FT reports

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Apple has reportedly recruited a prominent Facebook critic to its security team, in an apparent bid to differentiate itself from other major tech firms on privacy. According to the Financial Times, Apple has hired Sandy Parakilas, the former Facebook employee who blew the whistle on its privacy practices during the Cambridge Analytica scandal in 2018. He spoke publicly last year about how covert data harvesting by third-party developers was routine, just as Facebook was under scrutiny for failing to police developer use of its platform. The hire would be Apple thumbing its nose at Facebook and Google, given both firms rely on collecting user data for their ad businesses.

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Facebook rebuts Vietnam claims over alleged illegal content

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HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Facebook was defending itself Wednesday against allegations that it allows illegal content in violation of Vietnam's new cybersecurity law. "We have a clear process for governments to report illegal content to us, and we review all those requests against our terms of service and local law," the company said in a statement. The comments were in response to Vietnamese state media reports that the Ministry of Information and Communication had complained Facebook was allowing users to upload slanderous content and anti-government comments, among other alleged violations of a cybersecurity law that took effect Jan. 1. The law requires service providers such as Google and Facebook operating in Communist-ruled Vietnam to store user data locally, open local offices and remove offending content within 24 hours if requested by the authorities.

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[$$] Facebook on Notice as Vietnam Tightens Grip on Social Media

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The state Vietnam News Agency said Wednesday the Ministry of Information and Communications had complained to Facebook about pages that were critical of the communist state, but that the company hadn’t responded. The agency then reported the ministry as saying Facebook’s silence was a serious violation of Vietnam’s new cybersecurity law, which came into effect Jan. 1 and requires internet companies such as Facebook to quickly comply with government demands to remove content it doesn’t like.

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